AAJ Comment on New CMS “Conditions of Participation”

Nursing home case is quite expensive–few families are able to pay for that care on their own when the time comes. That is why many residents in these facilitate are in the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs. Payments for the care is usually made by these programs directly to the facility. Our Chicago nursing home abuse lawyers know that that is why regulations by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS) can strongly influence the conduct at these homes. By changing requirements for participation in the program, CMS spur action at most facilities across the country.

Recently, CMS issued changes to its clinical standards and quality review of the conditions of participation. The American Association for Justice (AAJ) commented on the changes, which offers a helpful way to understand how the CMS actions might affect the care actually provided to residents.

In general, the news is good as the comment explained that the “AAJ applauds CMS for taking steps to improve safety standards for nursing home and long-term care residents.”

However, AAJ reminded CMS that it was crucial to consider only changes to regulations what would “increase and incentivize patient safety through improved accountability and transparency.”

Our Illinois nursing home lawyers appreciate that while the change to CMS standards have as a partial goal the need to eliminate redundant, burdensome, or obsolete provisions, there is the risk that crucial accountability tools might be lost. It does not take much extrapolation to consider how this goal could lead to elimination of helpful accountability tools in the name of “efficiency.” This should never be allowed, particularly because of the continued inadequate care received by so many residents.

For example, the AAJ article reminds that of the 1.6 million American in these facilities, 23.5% were rehospitalized within 30 days. Many of those hospitalizations may have been avoidable or related to conditions which could have been treated outside of the hospital. In some cases this is directly connected to nursing home neglect and abuse. Not only are these hospitalizations bad for the residents themselves, but they are quite costly. Some estimates suggest that $4 billion can be saved by improving care at these long-term care facility and minimizing those return trips to the hospital.

It is crucial not to let claims of “overburdensome” CMS requirements allow standards to slip which not only do not address the existing problems but exacerbate them. In fact, many balanced efforts have found that requirements need to be strengthened–not weakened. For example, a 2009 Government Accountability Office report found that many state surveys on nursing home quality noted that many were failing to prevent (or even investigate) “high harm complaints.” This mirrors the experience of our Chicago nursing home attorneys who have worked on many cases where caregivers failed to meet basic safety standards and follow-up properly after accidents.

It is important for all those who care about the long-term care of senior residents to advocate for strong standards from CMS. Nursing homes will do what it takes to keep their income flow. If CMS–which provides that income flow–keeps requirements high, it is likely that residents will benefit from the level of care they deserve.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Choosing the Best Nursing Home

Consumer Voice Applauds Campaign to End Chemical Restraints

Nursing Home Lawsuit Back on After Appellate Ruling

The civil justice is never entirely predictable. Since each case is analyzed on its own merits and involve decisions by different judges and juries, it is impossible to say with specificity exactly how a certain action will end up. At times this leads to a legal roller coaster ride where cases have very big ups and downs. Our Illinois nursing home attorneys know, for example, that a case may even be completely thrown out of court only to come back in after changes are made or an appeal is granted. That appears to be what happened in a high-profile nursing home neglect case out of California.

New Case
According to the SF Gate, the lawsuit involved the owner of over 16 facilities over claims that care at those homes fell below the state’s staffing standards. The civil action was brought by a group of patients under claims that staffing levels were below the required amount at each of those homes at least 35% of the time. The suit seeks financial recovery for each violation of the law, but, more importantly, wants changes to be mandated to ensure patients receive the staffing level to which they are entitled.

At first the lawsuit was thrown out of court. However, a recent unanimous state appeals court ruling disagreed and said that the suit could proceed.

The Legal Issue
The main issue in the nursing home neglect case involves the standing of the parties to bring suit alleging violation of the state staffing standards. In their defense the long-term care facility owner alleged that only state regulators had the power to enforce those staffing standards–not private parties via a civil lawsuit. The lowest court agreed with that argument. The residents appealed.

Last week the appellate court issued an opinion in the case, deciding unanimously that the residents did in fact have the right to force compliance with the staffing requirements. In a logical opinion, the court wrote that residents can “bring actions themselves to remedy violations of their rights” This seems like a common sense notion, but all manner of legal maneuvers are often tried by these facilities in order to avoid accountability for their lack of providing proper care.

Each Illinois nursing home lawyer at our firm appreciates the importance of allowing residents to enforce their own rights. That is because many states have a somewhat mixed record of enforcing laws like this. If a statute is passed requiring improved care standards, it is of no value if the law is ignored and not enforced. Civil lawsuits offer a common-sense and fair way of ensuring those laws are followed and that residents are protected as intended by the legislature.

Expectedly, most state agencies explain that they do not have the necessary funding to meet the high demands of enforcement of these laws. In addition, there are often problem with staff training, with an inability to effectively identify caregiving problems and violations of safety standards. Unfortunately, Illinois has had similar concerns in recent years over proper staffing levels and enforcement of current rules.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Are Regulations Getting in the Way of Nursing Home Reform?

New Documentary Delves Into Impact of Music on Nursing Home Residents

Nursing Home Lawsuit Back on After Appellate Ruling

The civil justice is never entirely predictable. Since each case is analyzed on its own merits and involve decisions by different judges and juries, it is impossible to say with specificity exactly how a certain action will end up. At times this leads to a legal roller coaster ride where cases have very big ups and downs. Our Illinois nursing home attorneys know, for example, that a case may even be completely thrown out of court only to come back in after changes are made or an appeal is granted. That appears to be what happened in a high-profile nursing home neglect case out of California.

New Case
According to the SF Gate, the lawsuit involved the owner of over 16 facilities over claims that care at those homes fell below the state’s staffing standards. The civil action was brought by a group of patients under claims that staffing levels were below the required amount at each of those homes at least 35% of the time. The suit seeks financial recovery for each violation of the law, but, more importantly, wants changes to be mandated to ensure patients receive the staffing level to which they are entitled.

At first the lawsuit was thrown out of court. However, a recent unanimous state appeals court ruling disagreed and said that the suit could proceed.

The Legal Issue
The main issue in the nursing home neglect case involves the standing of the parties to bring suit alleging violation of the state staffing standards. In their defense the long-term care facility owner alleged that only state regulators had the power to enforce those staffing standards–not private parties via a civil lawsuit. The lowest court agreed with that argument. The residents appealed.

Last week the appellate court issued an opinion in the case, deciding unanimously that the residents did in fact have the right to force compliance with the staffing requirements. In a logical opinion, the court wrote that residents can “bring actions themselves to remedy violations of their rights” This seems like a common sense notion, but all manner of legal maneuvers are often tried by these facilities in order to avoid accountability for their lack of providing proper care.

Each Illinois nursing home lawyer at our firm appreciates the importance of allowing residents to enforce their own rights. That is because many states have a somewhat mixed record of enforcing laws like this. If a statute is passed requiring improved care standards, it is of no value if the law is ignored and not enforced. Civil lawsuits offer a common-sense and fair way of ensuring those laws are followed and that residents are protected as intended by the legislature.

Expectedly, most state agencies explain that they do not have the necessary funding to meet the high demands of enforcement of these laws. In addition, there are often problem with staff training, with an inability to effectively identify caregiving problems and violations of safety standards. Unfortunately, Illinois has had similar concerns in recent years over proper staffing levels and enforcement of current rules.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Are Regulations Getting in the Way of Nursing Home Reform?

New Documentary Delves Into Impact of Music on Nursing Home Residents

Settlement Reached In Chicago Nursing Home Neglect Case for $825,000

Each Chicago nursing home lawyer at our firm is proud to work on behalf of seniors and their family members following harmful abuse and neglect. Sadly, our work clearly indicates that we still have a long way to go before the level of care at all senior living facilities is up to par.

Time and again residents are injured or killed as a result of basic lapses in care which could and should have been avoided. Many of these incidents are swept under the rug. This is tragic, because it is usually only with full accountability that changes are made at these homes to prevent repeat occurrences. One on hand it is understandable for some families to avoid pressing their rights as there is a perception that the healing process is made harder when legal issues are raised. Yet, on the other hand, it is critical to ensure the rights of the one hurt are respected to the end–including protecting their rights even after a passing. No matter what there is nothing to lose by visiting with a nursing home neglect lawyer to share your story and learn what options are available before making a final decision.

Latest Settlement
Our Illinois nursing home neglect attorneys recently settled another case on behalf of a local family whose loved one died as a result of negligent care. The resident lived at the defendant facility for a seven and a half month stretch, from January 2007 to August 2007. Sadly, the care she experienced at the home appeared to be chronically bad.

For example, during that stay she had at least six different falls. The eighty-eight year old resident, like most her age, had some mobility problems. Preventing those falls is of obvious and paramount importance to caregivers at these facilities. It is particularly crucial for steps to taken to help those who have repeat falls. While a fall may seem like a small accident, to a 88-year old woman a single fall can prove incredibly harmful.

In this case, the facility in question did not create a care plan to prevent the falls or address her risk. It was not until her final fall–in August of 2007–that anything was done. The fall was particularly harmful. The senior’s eye literally burst in the incident, requiring an “eye enucleation” surgery. As is common when a senior requires extensive medical care, serious complications arose. She eventually suffered several cardiac arrhythmias and developed pneumonia while staying at the hospital. The string of medical problems–all arising from the fall–eventually proved too much for the senior to take. She passed away less than a month following her final fall at the facility.

The woman’s seven children eventually sought out the help of our Chicago nursing home attorneys to demand accountability. Recently, a settlement was reached with the facility for the full amount of the eroding insurance policy, over $800,000. The accountability will hopefully spur changes so that serious fall risks are actually addressed at the facility before they cause serious harm to the seniors at the home.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Nursing Home Fall Sparks Civil Lawsuit

Levin & Perconti Settle Nursing Home Neglect Case Against Clark manor Convalescent Center

Levin & Perconti Reach Settlement in Illinois Nursing Home Neglect Case

Two Chicago nursing home neglect lawyers at our firm recently settled a case on behalf of relatives of an individual who passed away after a stay at a local nursing home. The story is yet another reminder of the consequences of poor care received by these residents, and the vital importance of ensuring proper accountability when mistakes lead to serious harm.

In this case the resident first entered the defendant-facility, Renaissance Parks South (formerly Halsted Terrace Nursing), in the summer of 2005. He lived at the home for the next four and a half years. In the middle of this stay (October of 2007) the man was diagnosed with gastrointestinal cancer. To help treat the cancer the resident’s oncologist soon prescribed him a medication known as Gleevec. The treatment plan was straight-forward. The resident was to receive the medication regularly, with monthly appointments scheduled with the oncologist. The prescription would be refilled following each of those appointments, as a one-month supply was provided at a time.

Initially, the treatment seemed to be working as hoped. A few months after the diagnosis and beginning of treatment the tumor had shrunk in size. But, in investigating the case our Illinois nursing home neglect attorneys learned that problems arose shortly after the encouraging status update.

The regular monthly oncologist visit took place at the end of January in 2008 where his medication was re-filled. Yet, the February visit did not take place. As a result, the resident did not have his prescription re-filled, and it ran out in late February or early March. This oversight would prove quite costly, as the resident failed to receive the crucial treatments he needed to fight the cancer. He did not go back to the oncologist or receive his Gleevec medication for the rest of the year.

Making matters worse, the resident’s care chart at the facility wrongly indicated that Gleevec was given to the man throughout the year. Nursing home abuse lawyers know that false charting is quite common at these facilities.

In fact, it was not until a new staff member discovered that the Gleevec was not available (in early 2009) that the man finally went back to the oncologist–nearly a year after his last visit. By then, the lack of treatment for nearly a year allowed the cancer to grow and spread. The man’s prognosis was significantly downgraded in subsequent medical visits. Medical teams did the best they could to fight the spreading cancer, but the man ultimately died from complications in early 2010.

The man’s family–several siblings and a niece–sought out the help of our Illinois nursing home attorneys after the passing. A lawsuit was filed to hold the facility accountable for its conduct that led to the untimely death. Last month a settlement with the facility was reached to provide redress without the need to go to trial. The family will receive the maximum amount allowed by an eroding insurance policy, over $917,000. Hopefully, the effort will ensure this sort of basic oversight never happens again or causes injury to other residents at the home.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Levin & Perconti Settle Illinois Nursing Home Negligence Case for $1 Million

Settlement Pending Judge’s Approval in Illinois Nursing Home Neglect Case

Senior Hot Tub Death at Elmhurst Retirement Community

The Trib Local reported late last month on the tragic death of a 97-year old Elmhurst man, Raymond Urbans, who drowned while in a hot tub at a retirement community. Mr. Urbans was a beloved member of the community, and he was even honored in the past for his many years of tireless volunteer work. The case is another local example of the need for proper safeguards to be followed at all times to ensure preventable accidents are avoided that harm area seniors.

At first there was little information available on the passing, and it was unclear if foul play was involved. However, the DuPage County Coroner’s Office eventually released a preliminary report which indicated the death was due to drowning; third party involvement was not suspected. Yet, a full report on the cause and manner of death is not expected for another eight to ten weeks.

Our Illinois elder neglect attorneys know that it is vital that a full investigation be conducted to determine exactly how this was allowed to happen. The need for more information is made even more crucial considering the unique circumstances of this accident. For example, a follow-up story from my Suburban Life indicated that the local police chief noted that another person was in the hot tub at the time. Other people were also at the scene at the time of the drowning.

This raises the obvious question: How could a senior drown in a hot tub with others in and around the water? It seems nonsensical. Yet, it is not as uncommon as most might think. Each Chicago senior neglect lawyer at our firm has worked on cases where accidents caused serious injuries and even death while others able to help were mere steps away. Unfortunately, basic caregiving steps are often ignored a various facilities–from nursing homes and assisted living centers to retirement communities.

Proper observation is a central component of reasonable care. That is especially true in certain situations where the risks of harm are higher, like when a resident is in the bath tub or hot tub. Failing to properly monitor the situation can easily lead to serious harm. Seniors have unique vulnerabilities, and so tasks that would pose little risk to younger individuals may be quite dangerous for a senior. The entire point of living in certain locations–like a retirement community–is to have those unique living circumstances taken into account.

Senior living facilities have an obligation to provide reasonable care to residents at all times. While many facilities do a great job of assisting those who need day-to-day support, even a single lapse in proper observation or oversight can be the difference between life and death. When seniors are injured in our area in these ways it is important to visit with an Illinois elder neglect lawyer to explain the situation and ensure changes are made to prevent similar harm in the future. Seeking legal accountability in these situations is not about “getting even” or pointing fingers–it is about respecting those hurt and helping others in the future.

See Our Related:

Nursing Home Fall Sparks Civil Lawsuit

New Illinois Nursing Home Lawsuit Alleges Fall from Wheelchair

ProPublica is Launching a New App: Nursing Home Inspect

Many of us have heard tales of elder nursing home patients wandering beyond facility bounds—only to be found hours later by police or local citizens. Sometimes, nursing home staff have no idea that the individual was even gone. There are other stories, including the inspections done by Operation Guardians, which tell of horrific conditions. Of course, these events beg a multitude of questions: Are these isolated incidents or based on any series of patterns? How often do this occur?

Well, now ProPublica has an app for that.

Yesterday ProPublica, a non-profit, New York City-based corporation, is launching Nursing Home Inspect—a tool that allows members of the public to an easier access to data found in nursing home inspections conducted throughout the nation. Drawing on government reports posted online last month, the app has an easily searchable database of recent nursing home inspections, most completed since January 2011. That massive catalog includes nearly 118,000 deficiencies cited against 14,565 homes, though ProPublica intends to add more each month as new reports become available. This tool, unlike anything before allows individuals to analyze in-depth nursing homes throughout the Unite States.

Users can search across all the reports by keyword, city, state—an apparatus government’s official nursing home website doesn’t have. The results can then be sorted by the severity of the violation. For years, supporters of nursing home melioration have desired for agencies and organizations to make inspection reports readily accessible to the public. And, now ProPublica has.

Here, Charles Ornstein from ProPublica outlines how to utilize Nursing Home Inspect to its greatest capacity.

“It presents a tremendous opportunity to examine the scope of serious nursing home problems such as understaffing and misuse of antipsychotic drugs, and to see what, if anything, is being done about them,” said Michael Connors, an advocate with California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform. California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform was key player in the Operations Guardians inspections becoming public.

Though, many in the nursing home industry believe it does not actively reflect the quality of nursing homes. While such individuals agree that inspection reports are valuable for consumers, they also say the reports leave out important information. “One of our concerns is that it doesn’t acknowledge the things that the facilities are doing well,” said Lyn Bentley, senior director of regulatory services at the American Health Care Association, the industry trade group.

No one wants to believe their loved ones are being abused, but our San Diego elder abuse attorneys know it is more important than ever to be aware of the signs and symptoms of abuse. This new app is one step closer to granting full and clear information about local nursing homes. Many facilities are full of wonderful, caring people who work very hard to care for our state’s seniors. Others, instead, may be blighted with problems and neglectful care.

See Our Related Blog Posts

New Study Projects $65 Billion in Cuts for Nursing Homes

Recognizing and Avoiding Elder Financial Abuse

Man Sentenced Following Nursing Home Abuse & Medicare Fraud

Most of the most hideous cases of nursing home abuse are usually connected in one way or another to money. The drive for profit leads to costs being cut, staff levels kept low, and residents left to languish. The same drive for profits often affects the way the facility deals with the Medicare and Medicaid programs which pay for much of this care–with some attempting to bill as much as possible. For that reason, it is not uncommon to have Illinois nursing home neglect and Medicare/Medicaid fraud go hand-in-hand.

For example, the Sandy Springs Patch reported this week on the end of a criminal trial involving elder abuse and Medicare and Medicaid fraud. According to the story, there were many complaints made about three separate nursing homes owned and operated by a couple. The complaints alleged that residents were living in horrendous conditions at the facilities while the owners continued to rake in federal funds for their care.

The conduct eventually caught up to the couple after an investigation was launched by the U.S. Attorney’s Office. The details of the situations that came out are enough to turn the stomach. The conditions had deteriorated such that some residents were near starvation. The story notes that the conditions are the facility were simply unlivable: “roofs were leaky, air conditioning and heating units were broken, resident’s rooms were filled with bugs and rodents, rotting garbage in dumpsters were nearby, and mildew and foul odors swelled in the air.”

Even then, the facility was given many opportunities to correct itself. It was only after the owners did little to nothing to improve the situation that the facilities were closed and charges filed.

All told, the three facilities were home to over 300 residents. It is likely impossible to fully gauge the physical, mental, and emotional toll that these living conditions had on those forced to fend for themselves in these establishments. Our Chicago nursing home neglect attorneys know that so many seniors never understand that they have rights which must be respected by their caregivers. As a result, most simply deal with their difficult situation, no matter how unbearable. It is only when outside observers step in that anything is done.

In this case, criminal charges were filed against the owners following the investigation–criminal charges are somewhat rare in these cases. The case revolved around the horrid conditions and the fact that the owners received over $33 million over a three year period to provide the necessary food, medical care, and other basic services for the residents. The prosecutors alleged that the services provided were essentially “worthless,” constituting Medicare and Medicaid fraud.

This week one owner was sentenced to 20 years in prison for the Medicare and Medicaid fraud. The man’s wife (and co-owner) previously pled guilty to a string a charges connected to the incident, but she has yet to be sentenced.

Each Illinois nursing home abuse lawyer at our firm knows that while this case may seem to be an extreme example, it is indicative of the chronic mistreatment faced by so many seniors throughout our area. Please do not let any suspicions of neglect go unnoticed. If you or a loved one has been hurt by inadequate nursing home care, visit a legal professional and see what can be done to prevent further mistreatment.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Secretary Sebelius on Fighting Elder Abuse

Elder Abuse Prevention Laws Strengthened

Nursing Homes Must Account for Dementia Risks

A common theme in many tragic nursing home neglect cases is the vulnerability of the residents involved. For example, our Chicago nursing home neglect attorneys know from experience that residents with cognitive challenges–like dementia–are far more likely to be hurt in one way or another when they receive inadequate support at a long-term care facility. These stories are tragic not only because of the harm suffered by the residents–anything from serious injury to death–but also because caregivers know of the vulnerabilities and are charged specifically with taking the issue into account.

Resident-on-resident violence, wandering, and elopement are common instances of neglect that our Illinois nursing home lawyers have seen over the years disproportionately affecting residents with dementia. There is simply no excuse for facilities failing to protect these vulnerable individuals.

More About Dementia
Most have heard of dementia and understand that it relates to mental challenges seen in seniors. But the details of the condition are less well-known.

The term is somewhat fluid, without specific criteria–often generally referring to loss of cognitive ability beyond that what would be expected by normal aging. In other words, dementia is not a specific disease but a “non-specific illness syndrome” that is identified by the onset of symptoms. MD Guidelines explains that symptoms must usually be present for 6 months or so before an actual diagnosis is made. Those symptoms are far reaching, involving things like language, attention, memory, and problem-solving skills. All of the cognitive challenges make day to day living difficult (and dangerous) for the affected individual. Extra care, above and beyond what a family member can provide, is often needed when the symptoms build.

It is hard to overestimate the seriousness of the symptoms, particularly in their later stages. Around the clock care is critical at these times. It is not uncommon for those with dementia to eventually have trouble knowing where they are or even who they are. Obviously, if staff members at an assisted living facility do not provide around-the-clock support for those with these challenges there is a high potential for harm.

Dementia can be categorized in many different ways. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form, but there are many others like vascular dementia, semantic dementia, and frontotemporal dementia. About one in ten patients actually have “mixed dementia” with multiple forms of the problem existing at the same time.

It is not an isolated problem that affects a few–millions of Americans continue to face this condition in their later years. Beyond cancer, many public health studies have identified dementia as one of the leading health concerns in the country. It is no wonder why residents are concerned about dementia–it can wreck havoc on the lives of the one affected and their family.

Our Chicago elder abuse lawyers appreciate that the situation is made even worse when the condition is not taken into account by caregivers, resulting in serious injury If you or a loved one is affected by poor care of a resident with dementia, be sure to get in touch with legal professionals to share your story.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Key Advance in Alzheimer’s Research

New Study on Hospitalization Risks of Seniors with Dementia

Nursing Home Must Account for Dementia Risks

A common theme in many tragic nursing home neglect cases is the vulnerability of the residents involved. For example, our Chicago nursing home neglect attorneys know from experience that residents with cognitive challenges–like dementia–are far more likely to be hurt in one way or another when they receive inadequate support at a long-term care facility. These stories are tragic not only because of the harm suffered by the residents–anything from serious injury to death–but also because caregivers know of the vulnerabilities and are charged specifically with taking the issue into account.

Resident-on-resident violence, wandering, and elopement are common instances of neglect that our Illinois nursing home lawyers have seen over the years disproportionately affecting residents with dementia. There is simply no excuse for facilities failing to protect these vulnerable individuals.

More About Dementia
Most have heard of dementia and understand that it relates to mental challenges seen in seniors. But the details of the condition are less well-known.

The term is somewhat fluid, without specific criteria–often generally referring to loss of cognitive ability beyond that what would be expected by normal aging. In other words, dementia is not a specific disease but a “non-specific illness syndrome” that is identified by the onset of symptoms. MD Guidelines explains that symptoms must usually be present for 6 months or so before an actual diagnosis is made. Those symptoms are far reaching, involving things like language, attention, memory, and problem-solving skills. All of the cognitive challenges make day to day living difficult (and dangerous) for the affected individual. Extra care, above and beyond what a family member can provide, is often needed when the symptoms build.

It is hard to overestimate the seriousness of the symptoms, particularly in their later stages. Around the clock care is critical at these times. It is not uncommon for those with dementia to eventually have trouble knowing where they are or even who they are. Obviously, if staff members at an assisted living facility do not provide around-the-clock support for those with these challenges there is a high potential for harm.

Dementia can be categorized in many different ways. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form, but there are many others like vascular dementia, semantic dementia, and frontotemporal dementia. About one in ten patients actually have “mixed dementia” with multiple forms of the problem existing at the same time.

It is not an isolated problem that affects a few–millions of Americans continue to face this condition in their later years. Beyond cancer, many public health studies have identified dementia as one of the leading health concerns in the country. It is no wonder why residents are concerned about dementia–it can wreck havoc on the lives of the one affected and their family.

Our Chicago elder abuse lawyers appreciate that the situation is made even worse when the condition is not taken into account by caregivers, resulting in serious injury If you or a loved one is affected by poor care of a resident with dementia, be sure to get in touch with legal professionals to share your story.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Key Advance in Alzheimer’s Research

New Study on Hospitalization Risks of Seniors with Dementia